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Columns

  • Manicone column: We get into this business to tell our readers the truth

    A dedication to the truth and the communities we serve – that is what journalism is all about. A commitment to the people’s right to know.
    That idea is out of public favor these days.
    President Trump has led the charge against the news media. At one campaign rally, he jokingly imitated a journalist’s physical disability. Now he routinely labels accurate reporting as “fake news.” He calls the press pool that covers him “the most dishonest people.”

  • Summers column: Small-town journalists cut from the same cloth

    Overworked, underpaid, unappreciated outside a building with no windows and borderline burned out, I come close to quitting my job at least once a week.
    I have a wife and daughter, and most days I don’t see them long enough to have a conversation.
    After 20 years in this newsroom, I drink too much coffee and eat too many sandwiches at my desk.

  • Weimer column: Pets and fireworks do not mix well

    With the Fourth of July rapidly approaching, Phantom Fireworks would like to remind our friends and customers that some pets adversely react to the lights and noise of fireworks.
    With a little extra effort, our pets can be spared the trauma they sometimes experience from fireworks.
    Phantom Fireworks asks that you please be mindful of the following tips:
    • Keep your pets indoors during fireworks displays.

  • Moseley column: Be a hero: Donate your organs

    Organ donation saves lives and families. As of March, 115,000 men, women and children were on the national transplant waiting list.
    More than 33,600 transplants were performed in 2016 (2,853 so far in 2018). And every 10 minutes, another person is added to the waiting list.
    Although 95 percent of U.S. adults support organ donation, only 54 percent have signed up as donors. The reality is that 20 people die each day waiting for a transplant, according to organdonor.gov.

  • Treasurer's column: No cash payments at IL office

    Part of keeping the treasurer’s office taxpayer-friendly is coming up with new choices for improved customer service. As part of my promise to put Lancaster County taxpayers first, the treasurer’s office will soon begin offering service at the county’s new Indian Land Service Center.

  • Cureton and DeVenny column: Come tell us more of your dreams for county library

    We asked and you responded. Over 1,110 responses poured in when we asked you to reflect on your “library of the future.”
    Roughly 45 percent of our survey respondents came from the city of Lancaster, 41 percent from the Indian Land/Fort Mill ZIP codes, and 14 percent scattered across the rest of the county.
    We asked you to tell us about your households.
    Forty-three percent responded that you live in a two-person household, 12 percent said you have three in your home, 31 percent have four or more members and 14 percent live alone.

  • Newton column: Finally, solid rules for how HOAs work

    With the 2018 legislative session almost wrapped up, it’s time to look back at what has been a busy year. Some bills are still pending, and a couple of special sessions are planned for this summer.
    Here’s what we’ve accomplished at the State House so far. This is the first part of my 2018 legislative summary. As we continue to wrap up bills this summer, I will publish a second part with further updates on issues.
    HOA reform

  • Melton column: Parnell crashes and burns, kills Dems’ hopes in the 5th District

    Archie Parnell stopped by my office one day during last year’s special congressional election, and we chatted for 20 minutes or so.
    I liked him. He was one of the calmest, most mild-mannered, understated politicians I’ve ever met. He smiled easily, listened well, spoke softly and carefully, and made good eye contact and coherent policy points. He poked fun at himself. Some of his campaign commercials were flat-out hilarious.
    No one is laughing now.

  • Cauthen column: 2 simple, cheap ways to protect students, teachers from shooters

    The recent mass shootings at schools in Santa Fe, Texas, Parkland, Fla., and Benton, Ky., have generated a great deal of conjecture about ways to protect students during these outrages.
    Many of the ideas were complex, costly and difficult to implement, and none have received universal acceptance. But there are two ways to protect the students and teachers that are both simple and economical.

  • Noble column: Democrats have chance to change course of state this year

    When I was born, my father was a Presbyterian minister in the Upstate.
    A few years later, he took a new church and moved us all to Alabama. It was there, at a very young age, I learned the most important lesson of my life.
    As a man of God with a civic conscience, Dad believed he was called to be a voice for civil rights and human dignity. In the beginning, I didn’t know that he realized what it would cost him.