.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Cureton and DeVenny column: Come tell us more of your dreams for county library

    We asked and you responded. Over 1,110 responses poured in when we asked you to reflect on your “library of the future.”
    Roughly 45 percent of our survey respondents came from the city of Lancaster, 41 percent from the Indian Land/Fort Mill ZIP codes, and 14 percent scattered across the rest of the county.
    We asked you to tell us about your households.
    Forty-three percent responded that you live in a two-person household, 12 percent said you have three in your home, 31 percent have four or more members and 14 percent live alone.

  • Newton column: Finally, solid rules for how HOAs work

    With the 2018 legislative session almost wrapped up, it’s time to look back at what has been a busy year. Some bills are still pending, and a couple of special sessions are planned for this summer.
    Here’s what we’ve accomplished at the State House so far. This is the first part of my 2018 legislative summary. As we continue to wrap up bills this summer, I will publish a second part with further updates on issues.
    HOA reform

  • Melton column: Parnell crashes and burns, kills Dems’ hopes in the 5th District

    Archie Parnell stopped by my office one day during last year’s special congressional election, and we chatted for 20 minutes or so.
    I liked him. He was one of the calmest, most mild-mannered, understated politicians I’ve ever met. He smiled easily, listened well, spoke softly and carefully, and made good eye contact and coherent policy points. He poked fun at himself. Some of his campaign commercials were flat-out hilarious.
    No one is laughing now.

  • Cauthen column: 2 simple, cheap ways to protect students, teachers from shooters

    The recent mass shootings at schools in Santa Fe, Texas, Parkland, Fla., and Benton, Ky., have generated a great deal of conjecture about ways to protect students during these outrages.
    Many of the ideas were complex, costly and difficult to implement, and none have received universal acceptance. But there are two ways to protect the students and teachers that are both simple and economical.

  • Noble column: Democrats have chance to change course of state this year

    When I was born, my father was a Presbyterian minister in the Upstate.
    A few years later, he took a new church and moved us all to Alabama. It was there, at a very young age, I learned the most important lesson of my life.
    As a man of God with a civic conscience, Dad believed he was called to be a voice for civil rights and human dignity. In the beginning, I didn’t know that he realized what it would cost him.

  • Warren column: State must fix roads, bridges

    How many times do we have to see crumbling roads and bridges before we see action in Columbia?
    For decades, South Carolina has had roads that are in constant disrepair. It impacts economic development, public safety, tourism and our quality of life.
    We need a governor who will make transportation a priority. While career politicians will always cry for more money, that’s not the solution. That is an excuse. Our roads are failing because state government isn’t doing its job with the money it already has.

  • Collins column: USCL expands to meet IL needs

    According to our campus mission statement, USC Lancaster exists “to provide higher education and intellectual leadership to its service area.”
    Likewise, our mission notes that “the original design of the institution incorporated a flexibility that has allowed changes in institutional capability with increasing educational demands of constituents.”

  • Newton column: Here’s how House voted on budget

    The S.C. House passed its $8.2 billion version of the state’s general fund budget in late March, sending it to the Senate.
    Our state’s economy is booming, with low unemployment, continued business growth and a thriving tourism industry, so South Carolina brought in $326 million more than it did the year before in recurring dollars that can be used on yearly expenses.
    Here’s a look at what the House did:
    Required expenditures

  • DeVenny and Folks coilumn: JMS Foundation expanding its healthy community focus

    The J. Marion Sims Foundation was created from the sale of the hospital in 1995, with a goal of reinvesting those assets into the community to increase the health and wellness of our region. Today, as in those early days, we continue to focus on the goal of creating and sustaining a healthy community for all people. We believe that building a healthy community is a goal shared by many, so we asked for your input.

  • Gregory column: Senate tackles nuke debacle and a lot more

    The General Assembly is like the weather in that it rarely remains tranquil. Whether self-induced, or unrelated to our actions, something always stirs the place up.
    This session it’s the cessation of construction at the Jenkinsville nuclear reactors meant to power South Carolina for the next generation. The plug was pulled due to myriad problems, including the bankruptcy of the contractor, Westinghouse. What’s left is $9 billion in debt and a lot of questions.