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Education

  • Students spread cheer at children’s hospital

    It may not have been Santa on his sleigh, but to the patients of Levine Children’s Hospital, it may have felt the same when a group from Indian Land Middle School delivered several vehicles full of toys and gifts on Dec. 5.

    The visit ended more than a month of collections by the school’s seventh- and eighth-grade Student Leadership classes and student council.

  • And the beat goes on, on, on

    Karen Paulson

    For Carolina Gateway

    The 1950s Beat Generation had a delayed impact on some students at Indian Land High School last month.

    Josh Bowers’ English II students did a brief study on the Beat Generation, focusing on Jack Kerouac, Allan Ginsberg and Lawrence Ferlinghetti. After analyzing and evaluating the poetry and prose of the time, Bowers thought it might be a great experience for his students to not only write some of their own, but to read it in a coffee house setting as well.

  • School Notes

    LES Christmas concert Dec. 18

    Indian Land Elementary School will present its third- through fifth-grade Christmas concert at 7 p.m. Dec. 18 in the ILES gym. It is free and open to the public, although donations are welcome at the door.

    Two IL students win essay contest

    Two Indian Land students have been named winners in the Great American Smoke-Out Essay contest, sponsored by the Lancaster County Wellness Commission.

    Students wrote essays on “How Smoking is Bad for your Health.”

  • Lady Bruins, Warriors win

    The Lancaster Lady Bruins rallied late to notch a 53-50 comeback win over Class AAA foe Lugoff-Elgin on Tuesday night in the LHS gym.

    Dimaya Jones, who hit all of her 13 points in the second half, triggered the Lady Bruins’ final charge with 12 points in the fourth quarter. Jones sealed the game with 10 seconds to play as she dropped in two clutch free throws to give the LHS girls a 53-50 lead.

    Jones’ trey with 3:49 to play gave LHS a 47-45 lead it protected to the end.

  • Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

                   

    NEW YORK – The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History will sponsor 40 one-week teacher enrichment seminars across the United States and England for educators at every level. Participants in the competitive application seminars will receive a $400 stipend, books and room and board. Educators at all levels and National Park Service interpreters are eligible to apply.

  • School Notes

    Driver permit testing Thursday

     

    Editor’s note: We welcome your submissions. To submit information for School Notes, send it to Carolina Gateway at P.O.ee^Box 640, Lancaster,ee^SC 29721, fax it to (803) 285-5079 or e-mail it to cgnews@thelancasternews.com. Deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday for the next week’s paper.

    PTA meeting at ILES Thursday

     

  • USCL recognizes 2008 scholarship winners

     

  • Parents gain knowledge at ILMS seminar

    INDIAN LAND – Parents in the Panhandle received a lot of insight Nov. 20 regarding issues that may be bothersome to their children.

    Indian Land Middle School hosted a parent seminar that shed light on four topics – peer pressure, maturing bodies, eating disorders and gangs.

    Local professionals, as well as guests from Charlotte, facilitated the four sessions.

    Peer pressure

  • Gene Moore receives Wingate’s Distinguished Alumni Award

    Dr. Gene Moore often likes to stay in the background – shying away from the spotlight, though not hesitating to speak up when something needs to be said.  

    Given his humble nature, local school board members believed Moore, the Lancaster County School District superintendent, would have tried to prevent a special recognition at the most recent board meeting.

  • President gives update on York Tech

    With a struggling economy, York Technical College’s Kershaw campus may be as vital as ever to Lancaster County, according to the school’s lead official.

    York Tech President Greg Rutherford gave an update on the college’s latest moves and plans during a Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce meeting this fall. His presentation focused on the college’s local economic impact, the increased enrollment and expanded course offerings.