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Opinion

  • Toasts were frequent at the annual Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce’s Wine and Stein annual meeting at the Fairway Room on Jan. 24.

    The chamber event features a host of awards for deserving folks who seek to make a defining difference in our community.

    Mobley Drug garnered its share of awards at the meeting.

  • My name is Ruth Bell. My sister was Sandra Jeanette Mullis, who died in a house fire on River Chase Lane in Indian Land on July 14.

    I believe the details in the story (“One dead in Indian Land fire” in the July 18 issue of Carolina Gateway) gave out too much information. The only purpose I could see that it did was break her family’s heart.

  • It’s almost show time for the seventh annual Indian Land Fall into Fun Festival and third annual S.C. Championship Chili Cookoff.

    Saturday’s festival promises to be a lot of fun for everyone from toddlers to teens and older folks, all for a good cause.

    “This is the biggest fundraiser for the Indian Land Rotary Club, and what we do with the funds is give back, mostly to the local Indian Land community,” Indian Land Rotary Club President Dr. Adam Cooper said.

  • Sometimes it’s not all about the wins and losses.

    On Aug. 24, it was all about a new start for the University of South Carolina Lancaster soccer program.
    For the first time in the history of the school, the USCL Lancers teams were able to play matches on their own campus.

    As Lancers’ athletic director Rick Walters said, fans watching the matches were watching more than soccer, they were “watching history.”

  • Some of the anti-abortion believers across the nation have pushed or are pushing for the requirement that would-be procedure recipients be shown ultrasound images, as well as pictures as to what exactly happens during a procedure. This is a form of discrimination and doesn’t provide for the equal access of the alternate.

    If such laws are going to exist, then recipients are, as Justice Brandies said in his concurring opinion, “coerced by law [which is] the argument of force in its worst form.” See Whitney v. California, 274 U.S. 357 (1927) .

  • We applaud the S.C. Court of Appeals’ ruling that amending an agenda during a meeting does not jibe with the state’s Freedom of Information Act. We encourage all public bodies to stop changing their agendas after they have been posted.

  • Sometimes, the daily news headlines can get you down. Flipping through the newspaper or checking the day’s news online, often it seems as if there’s nothing but bad news to go around.

    Lately there’s been plenty, from the movie massacre in Colorado to depressing economic figures and even the passing of Andy Griffith, a man who embodied old-fashioned values from a bygone era.

  • There’s plenty of local football action on tap this weekend.

    The ninth annual Founders Federal Credit Union Kickoff Classic is set for Friday night at the Reservation at Indian Land High School.

    The annual scrimmage at ILHS is the only place you can see all four county high school teams in action at one place.

    Andrew Jackson High School kicks off the action as the Volunteers battle the McBee Panthers at 6 p.m.

  • It is not often that a politician will stick his neck out and address a problem that, although 100 percent correct, is not popular with the masses.
    Sen. Greg Gregory, I salute you. You have taken a position as a true leader and shown your constituency that not only do you recognize a health problem, but you have the courage to bring it forward to the people of your district with facts and directness.

  • Why were the Democrats defeated? And make no mistake about it - this wasn’t a win for Republicans; this election was an anti-Democrat vote. The Republicans only prevailed because the various TEA party movements didn’t coalesce into a third party. If they had, the Republicans would not be enjoying their new-found majority.

  • Indian Land is a beautiful community in Lancaster County with scenic country roads and attractive homes mingled with farms and thriving businesses.

    It is a shame that there is a constant trashing of Indian Land’s roadways by litterbugs and illegal dumpers.

    The situation deserves immediate attention and the Indian Land Action Council has formed an Anti-Littering/Gateways Beautification Committee to increase awareness and promote pride in Indian Land.

  • From the halls of Congress to the halls in small towns, the message is clear: No more taxes.

    No one wants to pay more in taxes. But when there is a dire need and no way to pay for it, sometimes that is the only answer.

    Such is the case in Indian Land. There is an effort under way to create an Indian Land Fire Protection District. The district would buy new equipment, station furnishings and fund new and existing firefighters.

  • A week ago, the ground moved.

    Not literally, of course. But the Nov. 2 election was obviously a huge one for the Republican Party.

    Nationwide, the GOP made impressive gains, most notably in the U.S. Congress, where Republicans gained control of the House and reduced the Democratic majority in the Senate.

    Republicans also made impressive gains in state legislature races across the country – something that will give the party an edge when redistricting is done based on the 2010 Census numbers.

  • First, let me say thank you to the people who worked the polls last Tuesday. We had more than 160 people who went through the training and were there from 6 a.m. to after 8 p.m., with several staying almost to 10 p.m.

    We have a group of dedicated public servants working with us on Election Day who catch a lot of heat for long lines and slow machines that they have absolutely no control over. But I had no complaints about anyone who was not treated with the utmost care. For that I say thank you.

  • My husband and I are senior citizens, retired and living in Cobblestone. We have both voted since we have been able to, in many states throughout our married life, as my husband is retired military (U.S. Coast Guard) and we’ve lived in many places.

  • It isn’t often that someone would purposely pay tribute to a man most thought of as “just an alcoholic.” But that is precisely what I have chosen to do.

    Harry Slagle lived in a non-pretentious place called Slagle’s Happy Acres, identified by a small wooden sign hung nearby. It was little more than an old, pale green, single-room cinder-block building, which sat off the gravel road a couple hundred yards or so from the old wooden Doby’s Bridge.

  • Someone shared the following incident with me. I do not know where the story originated. It tugged at my heartstrings as I’m sure it will yours.

    A man was waiting in an airport for a flight that was on delay. While he was drinking a cup of coffee and feeling irritable, his attention was drawn to a group of soldiers entering the snack bar.

    This group was made up of mostly male soldiers with a few female soldiers. They were talking among themselves about Afghanistan, this being the first leg of their journey to that land.

  • In response to Heather Breedlove’s letter regarding Sunday alcohol sales, I’d first like to say, I find its placement on the page ironic, if not comical, right next to the article entitled “Chamber wants you to Think Lancaster First.”

    Secondly, I must say I find it bewildering how Ms. Breedlove tries to make a connection between so many random things and Sunday alcohol sales.

  • Nov. 11 is the day set aside to give much-deserved recognition to those who gave their lives in service for our country.

    Veterans Day was established for that very purpose in 1918. That date coincides with the ending of World War I, also known as the Armistice, which was signed on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month.

    Celebrations across the nation include laying of wreaths at memorials throughout Washington, D.C., and festivities and parades in towns across America. Veterans of all wars will also be recognized for their service.